Super Bowl XLV has come and gone, and while we may have no earthly clue who won the game (hey, we were sitting here blogging the commercials all day), what we do know is every single commercial that aired. Oh god, do we know those commercials. This was a great year for commercials overall, with most of them being pretty darn good, some of them being not a complete waste of time, and only a handful making us angry that we had eyes and ears with which to experience the terrible-ness of their terrible-ocity.

Let’s walk through the best and worst of the 2011 commercial add season, and see if we can’t learn from their successes, and from their failures. Oh will we learn from their failures.

Super Bowl XLV – Top 3 Commercials

In no particular order, except for the very first one because everyone knows that it was the best, we give you the top 3 commercials from Super Bowl XLV, as judged in an entirely unscientific way by the folks here at superbowl-commercials.org. In other words, we like these the best.

Volkswagen – 2011 – Darth Vader

You had to know this was coming, right. As of the time of this writing, this commercial has 13,481,664 views, putting it up right there with… all the other commercials with over 13 million views. It’s brief, cute, and crystal clear, everything a good commercial should be.

Chevy Camaro – 2011 – Miss Evelyn

Oh, this spot stole our hearts, what with the unspoken bro-mance between the two voice leads and the hint of a dangerous backstory for the ever-changing Miss Evelyn. It’s almost like this commercial was written by our sixth-grade selves. It’s a little too complex to be memorable (if that makes any sense), but definitely deserves to be inducted into the commercial hall of fame.

Coca-Cola – 2011 – Border

We were pretty torn between this Coke commercial and the other, Siege. This one is simple and defined, and tells the story of a complex relationship without any dialogue. But the other commercial has a freaking dragon. We have to go with this one though, for no real clear reason other than that we love guys with swords patrolling a border in the heat of the deep desert.

Bottom 3 Commercials – The Worst Of The Worst

So overall we weren’t disappointed in too many spots this year. Sure some commercials failed to wow us, but there were precious few that were really horrible. Luckily for us we only needed three horrible ones for this article, and boy do we have three bad commercials for you.

Hyundai Elantra – 2011 – Deprogramming

As much as we love Jeff Bridges, we do hate bad commercials even more. This campaign was apparently all twisted around in some sort of meta-campaign involving a conspiracy about… oh dear, we’re not even sure we know why this is all supposed to make sense. You can check out their conspiracy-mongering at this website if you have a mind to, or just watch what a bad commercial they came up with to sell us their car.

Sony – 2011 – Android Is Ready To Play

So Sony decides to resurrect a terrible idea that Nokia had back in the oughts, which is for people to use their phones as a dedicated gaming console. Some may say that Apple has done this, but they haven’t really. They’ve provided a platform and an SDK, and developers have made the iPhone a gaming platform. Sony is sticking freaking Playstation controller buttons on their phone, that’s how insane they are about this thing.

Anyway, this commercial is even worse than the Playstation phone idea, if you can believe that. It’s ugly, gritty, borders on disgusting, and then you see thumbs on a robot and you’re pretty much done for the day. Enjoy!

Teleflora – 2011 – Help Me Faith

We hate to pick on this commercial because it’s for flowers, and that’s kind of like picking on the sweet, pretty, and slightly developmentally disabled girl that likes to eat clay. Plus, Faith Hill is in this and we still kind of have a crush on her, despite the fact that she stopped returning our phone calls weeks ago and pretends she’s not home when we knock on her back door. Sorry Teleflora, your commercial was nice but it was kind of… boring.